Sparklewren

aesthetic art corsetry

Bridal Week - from the portfolio

Often, the couture designs we dream up can easily be taken forward as inspiration for bridal pieces. Indeed, with so many brides opting for colour, sheers, unusual lengths, and corsets, "traditional bridal" (which is an idea that doesn't mean much anyway) is becoming less and less important. 

Of course, the brides that come to designers like me tend to already be quite creative souls who are keen to have something you can't find on the high street. So rather than make "sensible" portfolio pieces that fit "ordinary" codes of bridal design, I just make whatever I think will be beautiful. 

The two designs that I would like to share today were made back in 2011. Both feature proper corsetry as a base for embellishment and that combination of structure with surface embellishment is, unsurprisingly, an ongoing preoccupation of mine as a designer. 

First, Oyster. 

Immodesty Blaize in the Oyster gown, shot by Clive Arrowsmith.  Silk duchess, gorgeous shaping, lace, crystals and ostrich feathers. An absolute daydream of a gown, inspired by 50s couture. Pieces like this are obviously made as showpieces, and intended to be worn over a silk slip or tulle petticoats. Oyster was a delight to create though. I remember being in the pop-up boutique with a corsetmaking friend, with Oyster just there on a mannequin in the background. She had the lace and tulle, but I felt she wanted something more. Suddenly, feathers happened. Sweet serendipity.  The joy of Oyster, however, is that she lead us onto other bridal designs such as Sunshine and, more recently, Poppies&Pearls. I still love this look and hope to explore it again in the future. You can see Oyster worn by gorgeous Samio in InaGlo Photography's images below. 

Immodesty Blaize in the Oyster gown, shot by Clive Arrowsmith. 

Silk duchess, gorgeous shaping, lace, crystals and ostrich feathers. An absolute daydream of a gown, inspired by 50s couture. Pieces like this are obviously made as showpieces, and intended to be worn over a silk slip or tulle petticoats. Oyster was a delight to create though. I remember being in the pop-up boutique with a corsetmaking friend, with Oyster just there on a mannequin in the background. She had the lace and tulle, but I felt she wanted something more. Suddenly, feathers happened. Sweet serendipity. 

The joy of Oyster, however, is that she lead us onto other bridal designs such as Sunshine and, more recently, Poppies&Pearls. I still love this look and hope to explore it again in the future. You can see Oyster worn by gorgeous Samio in InaGlo Photography's images below. 

Then, Russet. 

Ivory Flame in the Russet corset by InaGlo Photography.  Russet uses corsetry in a different way to Oyster. Here, it is more of a hidden structure. The shape is undeniably corseted and of course pieces like this don't need to be so dramatically shaped... plenty of our clients prefer a more gentle silhouette, ideal for comfortable wear all day long. Either way, a properly structured corset can then be wrapped in silks as shown, with different textures and tones overlapping with other details such as lace, feather or crystals. Draping can visually create shape or bulk too, making it suitable for enhancing the curves of athletic physiques if wished, for example.  Likewise, the draping of Russet has lead onto other designs (including a teal and peacock bridal gown we made). That's the great thing about occasionally making flights-of-fancy for our own portfolio, they help give you a sense of what we could do. 

Ivory Flame in the Russet corset by InaGlo Photography. 

Russet uses corsetry in a different way to Oyster. Here, it is more of a hidden structure. The shape is undeniably corseted and of course pieces like this don't need to be so dramatically shaped... plenty of our clients prefer a more gentle silhouette, ideal for comfortable wear all day long. Either way, a properly structured corset can then be wrapped in silks as shown, with different textures and tones overlapping with other details such as lace, feather or crystals. Draping can visually create shape or bulk too, making it suitable for enhancing the curves of athletic physiques if wished, for example. 

Likewise, the draping of Russet has lead onto other designs (including a teal and peacock bridal gown we made). That's the great thing about occasionally making flights-of-fancy for our own portfolio, they help give you a sense of what we could do. 

I hope you've enjoyed seeing these two pieces! They represented a bit of a crucial moment for Sparklewren, a time where I began really feeling that I could be part of making truly lovely, couture pieces. More of the same for 2016 would be an absolute dream.