Sparklewren

aesthetic art corsetry

Future designs

Today I have mostly been trying to tidy up and prepare for next week! Some Basement Jaxx and Doves has helped. My table is now (closer to) tidy, which is letting me think forward to future designs. We're being really quite selective about the work we do these days. Indeed, we're very lucky that our clients are always so much on the same page as us! And creating the Curated Collections helps us all move towards beautiful aesthetics together. 

Tidying up today I was reminded of a few ideas I hope to pursue. 

Something in pale pistachio green. Organza and lace, encrusted with blossoms, somewhat like the Snowdrop design that we put forward in the "Where Angels" project in terms of silhouette. 

I'm imagining a Blossoms take on this design, but we'll have to see if we have time to make it happen. 

I'm imagining a Blossoms take on this design, but we'll have to see if we have time to make it happen. 

And perhaps a corset likewise. I am certainly considering ways of combining our lace blossoms with organza texture. Perhaps "lichen" like our Strawberry Leopard, though I've other ideas I want to explore too... 

Left: the Falling Blossoms on Helen Teiman, by Jenni Hampshire.  Right: the Strawberry Leopard on Leah Axl, by InaGlo Photography. 

Left: the Falling Blossoms on Helen Teiman, by Jenni Hampshire. 

Right: the Strawberry Leopard on Leah Axl, by InaGlo Photography. 

Something absolutely encrusted in gold is also on the list... I've a couple of thoughts here. One is layered gold couture lace, with gold blossoms and goldwork check beads scattered absolutely everywhere. A crushed honey interpretation of the falling blossoms aesthetic. Another is more like the Pyrite corset from "Where Angels", but instead of pyrite beading there would be goldwork motifs. Perhaps something heraldic like unicorns, lions, or griffins, or perhaps fruit. Years ago I wanted to make a silk damask corset with fruit motifs made from goldwork on hip and bust gores. I prefer duchess to damask these days, but the overall idea is still intriguing. 

Pyrite, as modelled by Karolina Laskowska. Imagine something like this, but with sparkly crunchy goldwork instead of fool's gold beading...  

Pyrite, as modelled by Karolina Laskowska. Imagine something like this, but with sparkly crunchy goldwork instead of fool's gold beading...  

I'd also love to do another sheer gown... whether that be blossoms or crushed gold. 

Oh, and we have also recently been salvaging couture lace from a few old samples... Does anyone remember the very muted off-pink Sophie Halette lace that I used to use all the time? Actually it was used on the Strawberry Leopard corset above, though you can't see it at a distance. I'll add another picture. 

Leah Axl by InaGlo Photography. That beautiful lace is here layered over leopard-print silk chiffon. Lord, I loved making this corset. And how amazing is InaGlo's imagery... <3 

Leah Axl by InaGlo Photography. That beautiful lace is here layered over leopard-print silk chiffon. Lord, I loved making this corset. And how amazing is InaGlo's imagery... <3 

Well I cannot get the colour anymore (it was a limited run). Not without special ordering a few grand's worth of it, anyway. But it's up there with the blossoms as my favourite lace to work with so I save absolutely any and every scrap of it that I find in my studio. We've finally collected together enough to do something special on one corset or possibly one bridal gown (if combined with other laces). So that's on the list, whether as a self-directed design or as part of a client's project. You know you'll probably remember this lace from various projects actually, including Sunshine and Oyster. 

The Sunshine bridal ensemble was awash with this delicious pinkish lace. 

The Sunshine bridal ensemble was awash with this delicious pinkish lace. 

Will we get all of these done? Probably not. But that's fine, I want 2016 to be another year in which we are proud of every single piece that we make. For each piece to be as inspired by the couture (in terms of ethos and quality) as possible.

We made only 39 corsets last year. The year before that it was 61, the year before that was 59, and so on. Probably less than some might think, more than others might have expected. But the fact that our numbers dropped last year was no unexpected thing as I had decided that I wanted to make fewer things that were more intricately worked than ever before. We basically made fewer corsets for the same income, which is a win from both a creative and business point of view and I'm expecting the number to drop again this year too. So by definition, we will be making fewer samples and taking on fewer clients. If I'm a very lucky girl, a good portion of the pieces we do make will allow us to explore the ideas I've outlined in this post. Here's hoping!