Sparklewren

aesthetic art corsetry

How to photograph corsetry

I will be taking some photographs today. And so I thought I would share a quick tip! 

Here's a before and after to illustrate. 

This image of gorgeous Helen Teiman in our Pyrite corset was taken very quickly, we had barely 5 minutes of this set-up and it was a last-minute thing at the end of a big day. But I love it! 

This image of gorgeous Helen Teiman in our Pyrite corset was taken very quickly, we had barely 5 minutes of this set-up and it was a last-minute thing at the end of a big day. But I love it! 

Aside from things like colour, brightness and contrast, you will see that the only noticeable difference is around the waist of the corset. This isn't a "photoshopped tiny waist" situation (as was recently in the media with a singer's music video), it's purely a question of not setting up the shot quite carefully enough, due to a lack of time. You can see that the stone wall is tonally similar to the corset. There are pieces of hanging tack/saddlery and dark shadows which are muddying the line between the corset and the background. The result is that the lines of the corset are somewhat hidden. With more time, we would have shifted the model slightly in one direction or another, to ensure that the background framed the waist cleanly. Instead, I edited the backdrop to be solid shadow on one side and solid wall on the other. This way, the lines of the photo aren't spoiled and you can see the proper shape of the corset (plus, the detail of the embellishment on that right-hand side). 

So there you go, today's tip! Frame your model/corset well, don't have things cutting into or confusing the lines of the corset. Save yourself editing time by getting it right in camera! People love corsets primarily for their silhouettes, so let that aspect of the imagery shine.