Sparklewren

aesthetic art corsetry

Ideals

Another glorious Spring day, my goodness me. 

I didn't have a big enough board! So he has no tail and his head is half glued on. Currently, he's just a tool for tracing around but if I can think of a use for a cutout I might retrace/recut a version from one proper piece of board. 

I didn't have a big enough board! So he has no tail and his head is half glued on. Currently, he's just a tool for tracing around but if I can think of a use for a cutout I might retrace/recut a version from one proper piece of board. 

Cracked on with the three educational boards I'm painting for the stables, much fun. One will have muscles, one bones, and another will be blank and in blackboard paint, so that the kids can use it for playing, marking points, and drawing markings, etc. 

My base coats from last week were suffering from an infusion of haylage and dead bugs (painting outdoors is lovely, except for that!), but a light sanding sorted the worst of it. I'd made an MDF template (right), so he was traced out in pencil thrice and today I was able to start painting. 

Also, just to pat myself on the back, how good is the scale of this beastie. When I cut the template out at home I couldn't remember the size of the boards which were at the stables, so I had to eyeball it. Very pleased with how he fits on the board! Means I'll have room for some information and either detail or top views down the side. 

Also, just to pat myself on the back, how good is the scale of this beastie. When I cut the template out at home I couldn't remember the size of the boards which were at the stables, so I had to eyeball it. Very pleased with how he fits on the board! Means I'll have room for some information and either detail or top views down the side. 

First thing I did was paint the outline for our "muscles" board. And then decided that painting was for fools, haha... By the time I was doing the outline for the "skeleton" board I'd switched to marker pen, far nicer and far far faster. Still, the muscles board doesn't need as crisp an outline as the skeleton (on account of all the painting it will be filled with), so I can live with it.  

Isn't he quite smart though! I've outlined a horse that I would buy, ha!  

I had wanted to get further along today, but it's just as well to step back for a while, after sketching in pencil. His eye socket looks a little high, the shoulder possibly slightly more sloping than I'd like, and the cervical spine is coming into the body maybe a shade higher than would be true. Which is all by-the-by I suppose, there seems to be huge variation in the accuracy of the reference images I'm working from, nevermind variety between individual animals... But I'd like for our "model" to have as good conformation as possible, and as accurate details as I can manage. Plenty of our girls end up going to college or uni for horse care studies, or doing their BHS exams up to a certain level, so it certainly wouldn't hurt to get their eye in by seeing a well drawn educational illustration each week.  I love all this anatomy stuff so I'm having much fun doing it, but it's also really satisfying being able to put my skills to use for the benefit of other people. Especially something that will be useful for years to come, regardless of whether I stay in the region or whatever. 

I had wanted to get further along today, but it's just as well to step back for a while, after sketching in pencil. His eye socket looks a little high, the shoulder possibly slightly more sloping than I'd like, and the cervical spine is coming into the body maybe a shade higher than would be true. Which is all by-the-by I suppose, there seems to be huge variation in the accuracy of the reference images I'm working from, nevermind variety between individual animals... But I'd like for our "model" to have as good conformation as possible, and as accurate details as I can manage. Plenty of our girls end up going to college or uni for horse care studies, or doing their BHS exams up to a certain level, so it certainly wouldn't hurt to get their eye in by seeing a well drawn educational illustration each week. 

I love all this anatomy stuff so I'm having much fun doing it, but it's also really satisfying being able to put my skills to use for the benefit of other people. Especially something that will be useful for years to come, regardless of whether I stay in the region or whatever. 

The second pic to the right will be the muscles board. Going to paint the deep muscles directly in place and then have laminated separate superficial muscles to stick on top. Going to be so much fun for our teachers to use with the kids! And I'm glad I made the starting template to have consistency throughout. Because then any stick-on bits can be used with any board, loads of fun. I'll be doing some stick-on tack, for example, so say you're teaching about bridle fit... You could teach on the blackboard with no distractions, on the muscles to talk about jaw movement, chewing and such, or on the skeleton to talk about fitting around the projecting cheek bone, being careful of the nasal bone, bit placement, things like that. Or say with a saddle, you could put it on the muscles and talk about how the fit needs to distribute pressure to avoid atrophy, or put it on the skeleton and talk about room for the shoulder blade to come backwards and beneath the saddle. 

But educational fun aside, I'm also just really looking forward to drawing out some different types of tack. I think our "model" horse will be rather spoiled for choice! Reckon he'll look especially smart in a nice dressage saddle, or straight-cut showing saddle. Ooh, or a side-saddle. I'm going to draw all the pretty gear horse-people would buy if money were no object, haha. Ah, could even do headcollars, cavessons, Micklems, etc., alongside the more common bridles. Going to have fun! It's like those paper dolls I played with as a kid, but for ponies. Hmm, I wonder if a book like that exists... If not, I might have to make it! 

In other news, I had my third driving lesson today and it was much fun, once again! We went further afield this time, tackled a few new "hazards" and had to cope with busier roads, pedestrians, and cyclists. Hilariously, my instructor at one point said, "sometimes there's ponies loose on the road at this point, but I'm sure we'll be fine" and I had to laugh. He was referring to a different yard entirely, but since a couple of ours were playing "escape artist" last weekend it was funny timing. 

Got up to fourth gear, woo me, what a speed demon, ha. Did more in the way of turns into busy roads, began intuitively going up the gears without prompting, braved a single-file tunnel, and otherwise had a very good lesson. Each time I get in the car again I think, "it's been a week, I can't remember!" and then it turns out fine, naturally. Apparently we might tackle three point turns and/or roundabouts next week, so that'll be fun. I reckon reversing will be my Achilles' heel, it's going too well so far! 

But I can see how people come to enjoy the freedom of driving, once they've gotten past the feelings of, "how does this work again?"  

Right, dinner's ready so time to go.