Sparklewren

aesthetic art corsetry

Milky skies

Computer tasks were starting to send me stir crazy. So I popped out into the drizzle to take some (bad) snaps and continue learning a bit more about photography.

I love taking Instagram shots and such of my work, and find myself taking more pictures than I ever used to. I do wonder if a big part of this is the ease of doing so these days. My bridge camera (a Fuji Finepix from a decade ago!) is fine I am sure, but it isn't as intuitive or user-friendly as even an iPad! I am not really qualified to draw proper conclusions, but it seems to me that if I want reliably pretty snaps of my work for Instagram, etc., then the huge screen and easy UI of the iPad is perfect... If I want detailed close-ups from the studio, or to just play and learn more about taking pictures (my current thinking), you'd think my old Fuji (being a "proper" camera in which you can go manual and control aperture/shutter speed/iso/etc.) would do the job. But I do find I am very quickly coming up against limitations. Ha, both my own and the camera's! For example, I will find that I'm interested in controlling the depth-of-field and focus more than I can with the Fuji's fixed lens. That I want to get really close to a detail, or that I wish I had slower shutter options so that I could play more.

Of course, none of that accounts for the poor composition and limited knowledge on display in my pictures ;-) One must work with what they've got! At any rate, I am enjoying learning a bit more about photographs. I tried when at uni, but lacked confidence and the tuition wasn't readily available. Would have been better off with a cheap-and-cheerful night-class than the university photography module I think. And normally, I've found myself drawn to painting and drawing instead. But painting, unsurprisingly, is just too messy (the way I do it, anyway!) to have in the same studio as bespoke corsetry.

I think perhaps photography begins to be interesting again, precisely because interacting with images (editing) is now so much more intuitive. These are all straight from camera though, else how I am to learn?

I think that perhaps a problem with pictures is that if there is something pretty in front of you, you can get away with not actually being that great at taking pictures. Just look at my snaps of corsets! Still, you learn by doing. I've certainly figured out which angles are good for corset/mannequin shots, and have also found that I (in my picture-infancy) seem to prefer square and 16:9 formats over anything else. So the ordinary format of a camera is almost harder to fill than the square frame of my iPad's camera software.

I suppose in natural light, getting the exposure you need in one part of an image can be to the cost of another part.

Though this seems too bright or flat to me. If anything, the shots which are slightly underexposed appeal most. Perhaps that is just a taste thing.

Though this seems too bright or flat to me. If anything, the shots which are slightly underexposed appeal most. Perhaps that is just a taste thing.

Too close to focus. Fury.

Too close to focus. Fury.

I did take some colour shots, but they muddled me. I've not the skill to deal with colour! I think I would have appreciated manual focus and a shallower depth-of-field here.

I did take some colour shots, but they muddled me. I've not the skill to deal with colour! I think I would have appreciated manual focus and a shallower depth-of-field here.

Milk of magnesia sky. Though I found myself preferring the darker shot below (even though this one is arguably more "true").

Milk of magnesia sky. Though I found myself preferring the darker shot below (even though this one is arguably more "true").

Darker. I've just remembered another camera my dad had, though I can't remember what it was called... I think it was intended specifically for architecture shots and I remember dragging it around granite-grey Aberdeen with me (I started at Grey's School of Art there, before becoming overwhelmed and ending up at Leeds). It was kind of vertical in it's shape and how you held it, looked sort of more like a little video camera than a stills one. I can't remember if it was digital or film. I'd assume the latter, but really can't remember.

Darker. I've just remembered another camera my dad had, though I can't remember what it was called... I think it was intended specifically for architecture shots and I remember dragging it around granite-grey Aberdeen with me (I started at Grey's School of Art there, before becoming overwhelmed and ending up at Leeds). It was kind of vertical in it's shape and how you held it, looked sort of more like a little video camera than a stills one. I can't remember if it was digital or film. I'd assume the latter, but really can't remember.

Someone must have had a little crash on my road. In looking up then down, towards the hazy obscured sun and away from it, I was playing with the controls a lot. Which is the point, to learn. Very impractical though, not easy to do swiftly at all and you need to move your right hand around such a lot that you're not really holding your view whilst doing so. You're not thinking about the photograph, you're thinking about pressing the button whilst clicked another so as to change the f-stop. By which I mean, it isn't exactly a pleasure to work with this camera if you have it on manual. I was talking with Glo about this too, that good tools are the ones you use. After all, I've had this Fuji for 10 years. Used it for a while, then only got it out when I really needed to take a picture (eg: to sell something on ebay), and then largely ignored it as smartphones and tablets had come along and made taking casual shots much more enjoyable. Or if I wanted to actually play with depth-of-field and such, any old 35mm film camera was more fun (winding the film, the satisfying shutter sound, it's just nicer). The only reason for playing with it now is that I've a wish to better understand photography and to have a hobby outside of corsetmaking. If I had a different option (and I hope I will, before the year is out), I doubt I'd pick up the Fuji for anything at all. It works, it's functional, but so what? An overlocker is also a wonderful thing, but it's no use for making Birds Wing corsets... Tools have to suit your working habits and requirements.

Someone must have had a little crash on my road. In looking up then down, towards the hazy obscured sun and away from it, I was playing with the controls a lot. Which is the point, to learn. Very impractical though, not easy to do swiftly at all and you need to move your right hand around such a lot that you're not really holding your view whilst doing so. You're not thinking about the photograph, you're thinking about pressing the button whilst clicked another so as to change the f-stop. By which I mean, it isn't exactly a pleasure to work with this camera if you have it on manual. I was talking with Glo about this too, that good tools are the ones you use. After all, I've had this Fuji for 10 years. Used it for a while, then only got it out when I really needed to take a picture (eg: to sell something on ebay), and then largely ignored it as smartphones and tablets had come along and made taking casual shots much more enjoyable. Or if I wanted to actually play with depth-of-field and such, any old 35mm film camera was more fun (winding the film, the satisfying shutter sound, it's just nicer). The only reason for playing with it now is that I've a wish to better understand photography and to have a hobby outside of corsetmaking. If I had a different option (and I hope I will, before the year is out), I doubt I'd pick up the Fuji for anything at all. It works, it's functional, but so what? An overlocker is also a wonderful thing, but it's no use for making Birds Wing corsets... Tools have to suit your working habits and requirements.

Actually used the zoom for this shot. Loved the texture of the peeling paint. We've each different notions of beauty and beauty inspires. I create better work when surrounded by beautiful things, that's a fact. I suppose this is why architects concern themselves with creating spaces that elevate the mind, and why craftspeople enthuse over the appearance of their gear... 

Actually used the zoom for this shot. Loved the texture of the peeling paint. We've each different notions of beauty and beauty inspires. I create better work when surrounded by beautiful things, that's a fact. I suppose this is why architects concern themselves with creating spaces that elevate the mind, and why craftspeople enthuse over the appearance of their gear... 

I tell a lie, you can manual focus on this camera, it's just a right pain in the backside.